Special events, Glen Lakes on Oct. 23 agenda

By: 
DARRELL JACKSON, Staff Writer

Glendale City Council is tentatively scheduled to receive an update and recommendation for two hot-button items during the Oct. 23 workshop.

The City Manager’s Office has tentatively scheduled Oct. 23 to present the city’s recommendation on the future of Glen Lakes Golf Course, as well as the future of special events, including Glendale Glitters.

In July, after returning a weekend of Glendale Glitters special programming to the 2018 schedule, and previously eliminating all December special programming weekends, staff has been researching the future of the city’s special events.

As for the present mission of downtown festivals, according to the special events mission statement, it is “to promote and brand downtown Glendale as a destination and attract new visitors and potential shoppers to the area, while fostering community pride among its residents.”

The main issues with the events, according to staff, are the cost to the city and its return on investment, which led to the original elimination of all December special programming weekends. Three possible decisions are on the table, including continuation of the events as they are, eliminating all but two programmingweekends and canceling all future events.

Since 2012, in a review of city costs, special events has budgeted 44 events, with only six showing a profit. Those were the Chocolate Affaire in 2012, 2013 and 2014; Glitter Spectacular in 2015; Summer Band in 2012; and Jazz Festival in 2013, the last year that event was held. The total profit for all of those events combined was $110,492, of which the high was $45,519 for the 2014 Chocolate Affaire and a low profit of $183 for the 2013 Jazz Festival.

Over the past seven years, the city has budgeted for a loss of $6.5 million, but has lost an additional $1.6 million on top of that, which does not include 2018, since final numbers have not been completed.

Glendale City Manager Kevin Phelps said in July the city started looking at how it is investing in downtown and began to ask tough questions, which led to the staff research.

He said then that the short answer was the events were not really worth the cost to the city, which has been investing about $1.2 million a year into a six-block radius downtown, with the annual return at only $300,000 through sales and property tax.

Also scheduled to be discussed during the Oct. 23 workshop is the future of the city-owned Glen Lakes Golf Course, which has been in disrepair for years.

Council recently approved a new course manager, Golf Maintenance Solutions 5W, LLC, as well as the transfer of funds for needed emergency repairs to the course, all while it continues to research the future of the course.

In August, numerous councilmembers questioned the transfer of funds for a course that has lost the city millions over the past decade.

Among the possible decisions to de discussed include to either continue to own and run Glen Lakes as a golf course, sell the land to a private developer or create a park or green-belt type area.

A fourth possibility was recently brought forward when Tom Loegering, who is part owner and CEO of Sun City Country Club, mentioned bringing his nonprofit organization called Golf Program in Schools (GPS) to Glen Lakes and have local schools use the course.

During the Oct. 23 workshop, council is expected to give consensus for a decision on each of the items for a possible future vote. Workshops are held at the Council Chambers at 5850 W. Glendale Ave. starting at 12:30 p.m.

The Glendale Star

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Peoria Times

Peoria Times
7122 N. 59th Ave
Glendale, AZ 85301-2436
Ph: (623) 842-6000
Fax: (623) 842-6013

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